Language: Egyptian Arabic: a phonemic inventory of the language’s consonants and vowels, including all forms of phonemic contrast (e.g. length, tone, stress, aspiration, etc.) and the most common allophones (e.g. [ʔ] (glottal stop) and [ɾ] (alveolar tap) aren’t phonemes in English, but they are common allophones).

1. a phonemic inventory of the language’s consonants and vowels, including all forms of phonemic contrast (e.g. length, tone, stress, aspiration, etc.) and the most common allophones (e.g. [ʔ] (glottal stop) and [ɾ] (alveolar tap) aren’t phonemes in English, but they are common allophones)
2. a descriiption of at least one alternation common in the language, including the alternation itself, the conditions for the alternation, exceptions, examples, and a brief examination of how or why it occurs
you may choose to include a detailed descriiption of a single, complex or interesting alternation or multiple simpler descriiptions of more straightforward alternations
You may additionally consider including:
((You do not need to answer all of the following))
1. a descriiption of the common or exceptional phonotactic constraints in the language
2. a descriiption of the language’s orthography and/or its phoneme-grapheme correspondence (i.e. how well do the sounds of the spoken language map to the symbols of the written language)
3. other interesting linguistic details about the language relevant or tangential to its phonology
SOURCES:
Wikipedia – we’ve come a long way with Wikipedia, and while people do still write erroneous or joke articles, it can be a great starting point at the very least. I often reference Wikipedia while looking for phonetic or phonological information on languages and dialects. You can always just search for whatever language you are interested in and scroll through the article looking for the phonology. Most articles I comb through don’t discuss the phonetics of the language as a separate part, so you’ll be looking for Gujarati Phonology, for example. In some cases, for smaller or less studied languages, there won’t be a separate phonology article, it will just be a section of the language article (as it is for Malayalam, for example). And remember, Wikipedia tries to be strict about its own sources/references, so you can always use it as a starting point, and work your way backwards from it – see where the article gets its information from and use that as a source yourself.
Ethnologue – Ethnologue is a great resource for language demographics and information. It provides a lot of information for a lot of languages and includes search and browse options. You can look up populations, locations, dialects, typology, official status, language family, etc. Make sure you access this website while connected to the MSU network, it will allow you full access to the site based on our university’s academic license.
Any other reliable resources (scholarly articles only)

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